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Celebrating King

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…the best way to celebrate the legacy of Dr. King is to wake up the humanity that lives in your soul and to use it to stand against the injustices that are impacting our brothers and sisters all over the world.

…that means standing against the murder of innocent people at the hands of war; whether it be by Christians or Muslims, whether it be at the hands of the East or the West… Please do not murder any more people under the false pretense of protecting my liberties

…that means standing in opposition of poverty… there is no reason for nations with a gluttonous excess of riches to be okay with watching human being starve… the idea of the wealthy people earning everything they have through hard work and sound business practices is simply untrue… the wealth of our great nation was built at the expense of the lives of others…

…that means standing up to the militarization and the ongoing abuse of power by our police force…. there is simply no excuse for the continuous murder of unarmed human beings by representatives of a government that stands for Liberty and Justice for all…

…learn, understand, teach, remember who Dr. King was and what he stood for. Yes, he was a Civil Rights activist… but Dr. King was also a man who was willing to die to put an end to the human rights violations that were being committed, not just again black people, but against people all over the world…

…In honor of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., let’s stand on the shoulders of love and continue his fight to put an end to the attack on innocence that is being waged all over the world from the Americas, to Europe, to the Middle East, to Africa, to Asia, to Australia, and to every dark corner of the world that injustices are being committed… When we do this, then we can say we are truly celebrating the legacy of Dr. King. ~Sean King

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Maybe Then

Celebrate Life

 

…maybe then…maybe after you’re done obeying all the rules, dressing in all the right clothes, going to all the right schools, chasing all the right jobs, networking with all the right people, and doing everything they told you that you need to do to be successful all the way down to eating Sushi, drinking Starbucks, and disowning all of your family and friends who aren’t career oriented because them being in your life ain’t — excuse me, is not a good look with the people you’re trying to impress… and then you realize that you’re not happy…

…maybe then you’ll flip your middle finger to peer pressure, quit worrying about everyone’s opinion of you, go back to drinking red Kool-Aid, eating chicken, and being happy to see your not so perfectly mannered family members that will rob an armored truck to give you an opportunity to be successful because they genuinely love you instead of spending all your time trying to brown nose those stiffs for a promotion…

…maybe then you will dust off your dreams, your ambitions, your purpose, and fight to become the person you are supposed to be… not the one that sounds good to everyone else, but the invisible you that’s being murdered a little bit everyday in your prison of self inflicted mediocrity of wanting to look good in the eyes of everyone else, the one that’s fighting from deep down in your soul to liberate you from the rat race…

…maybe then you will get off your ass and say what you have to say, do what you need to do, be who you want to be…

…maybe then you will remember what it means to be genuinely happy….

…maybe then you’ll do “That Thing”… ~ Sean King

Dr. King the Revolutionary

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Kill the man. Sanitize the cause. Make him an American hero. Give the people a holiday. Let the people have their sanctioned marches and rhetorical speeches on his dream… But whatever you do, never let it be known that King was killed, not for his stance on race but for his position on war. For his desire to see equity across humanity. For his work to build coalitions with other non-black groups who stood for the same things he stood for. For his push to ensure every citizen in this rich nation had guaranteed income levels so they too could compete for this dream of ours.

Dr. King was not just a Civil Rights leader who wanted little black boys and little white girls to be able to hold hands without fear of persecution. Dr. King was a revolutionary that questioned America at its very core.

I too celebrate the dream of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The problem is, I’m not sure we’re talking about the same King or the same dream. We’ve made progress, but we’re no where near where we need to be; meaning we still have work to do. ~ Sean King